Observing

Walking is a big part of my photography practice. There is no better mode of transport than travelling on foot to get to know a place.  Anything faster than walking and I feel like I am missing photo opportunities.  Then there are times when even walking seems too fast, especially when I am in a new place.  So the only thing left to do is to sit down in a cafe or tea house and observe!

Izmir, Turkey, 2014OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Reframing 2014

Choosing a ‘best of’ list is not a natural thing for me to do as I don’t have favourites in my life.  I don’t do bucket lists or top ten books, movies, music etc.  My preferences change all the time, it’s what keeps me focussed on the present.  As a photographer this is vital. I do, however, like the challenge of selecting my best images for the year because it gives me a chance to select and re-frame photos.  It’’s about finding the strongest visual narrative.  I do this with every series that I create, be it on a daily or monthly basis.  These images have in some way captured the emotion of the moment.

Taking photos is a challenging notion for me.  It means getting closer to people, the environment and myself.  Photography has always been a way for me to discover the world anew every time I lift the camera to my eye.  It is at times confronting, even scary but ultimately liberating.

My goal for 2015 is simple: I want to stay in the uncomfortable zone, take less photos but better images.

Cats of Ephesus

The ancient Greek city of Ephesus, (Efes) in Turkey is home to a bevy of well-fed felines, curled up on marble columns and sprawling in the sun. They have resided here since antiquity. In Islamic tradition cats are admired for their cleanliness and throughout modern day Turkey are treated with kindness, even venerated. The medieval Egyptian zoologist Al- Damiri (1344-1405) wrote that the first cat was created when God caused a lion to sneeze, after animals on Noah’s ark complained of mice. The cats usefulness in ridding cities of rats and mice not only assisted in protecting the granaries and library scrolls from being eaten but also the spread of disease by vermin. Their venerable status is therefore nothing to be sneezed at!