Song of the Frogs

This story is an excerpt from Morgan Schatz Blackrose’s upcoming biography:

Stories in my Life: Living and Dying a Storyteller.

There was once a chief who brought his people to camp on the edge of a swamp. They lay down to sleep that night to the sound of the frogs’ song. The array of rhythmic croaks and calls brought great comfort to the people because it signified the harmony in which they all lived. But the chief was outraged with the ribbitting racket of the swamp dwellers and screamed for them to shut up. They were disturbing his sleep. But the frogs paid no heed to the rantings of the chief and continued their song. The chief tossed and turned and bellowed his fury at the frogs, but they continued their song well into the night. At dawn the chief had worked himself into a state of rage not only at the frogs’ song but their refusal to be silent. He called his warriors together and demanded they bring everyone before him. When all the people were assembled the chief proclaimed that the frogs were to all punished for disturbing his peace. Everyone was given a large stick and ordered to enter the swamp and beat the frogs to death. If they refused to carry out the chief’s orders they would be beaten instead.

With great reluctance the people took the clubs and trudged into the swamp. All except an old woman who refused to take a stick and remained steadfast in front of the chief.

‘Why do you defy me?’ demanded the chief.

‘Because all is connected,’ she answered.

‘What do you mean?’ asked the chief.

‘You will find out,’ she replied.

The chief glared at the old woman, then shouted for her to leave him before he beat her himself.

Later that day the people sat around their camps, disheartened by the dreadful deed they had carried out. That night an eerie silence filled the air. The people found it hard to sleep, knowing that the frogs were no longer their companions. The chief however slept soundly, that night and the next.

It was the third night that he was awakened by an annoying hum. Swarms of mosquitoes descended on the camp. The mosquito larvae no longer eaten by the frogs had all hatched and the swamp was infested with millions of mosquitoes. The night air was filled with the drone of mosquitoes punctuated by the sounds of people slapping their bitten skin.

‘Enough is enough,’ they cried, and quietly gathered their belongings and moved away from the swamp and their chief.

At dawn the following day the chief, who had barely slept a wink, stood up and looked around. He was all alone, except for the old woman who had refused to kill the frogs. She stared at the chief’s bite ridden face and body and shook her head.

‘Now do you understand what I said about all being connected?’ she asked. 

Then she turned from him and walked away, leaving him with no one to rule over but the mosquitoes.

Story Source: Eleven Nature Tales A multicultural journey by Pleasant DeSpain

August House, Little Rock Arkansas US copyright 1996

Photo: Roman W. Schatz, 2020

diana Foma March20

This entry was posted in Uncategorized by Roman W. Schatz. Bookmark the permalink.

About Roman W. Schatz

Roman W. Schatz is a Swiss photographer based in Australia. A frequent traveller, Roman has a particular interest in capturing time and place. Using the visual language of the photographic image, he believes that art is an international language that can be used to communicate the humanity that unites us all.

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